Landscape Conservation and Local Infrastructure Program

Revitalizing our communities while conserving farms & forests, the Landscape Conservation and Local Infrastructure Program is a ground-breaking program that will dramatically impact how we shape our future. It combines a real estate tool called Transfer of Development Rights with a public financing opportunity for cities.

Occidental Park in Pioneer Square, Seattle
Photo by Wilford Brimley
  • ADD—Conserved farms and forests

    Transfer of Development Rights (TDR) is a market-based tool that promotes growth in places it is desired while conserving farms, forests, ecologically significant areas and open space. It gives landowners the option of selling the development value from their property as an alternative to building. Developers purchasing these rights receive bonuses, such as additional height or square footage, in areas more suitable for growth.

  • PLUS—Revitalized communities

    In exchange for accepting development rights, cities gain access to financing for revitalizing and redeveloping neighborhoods. Shared tax revenue generated by growth allows cities to invest in parks, streetscapes, utilities, roads and other infrastructure that helps make communities attractive places to live and do business.

  • TO EQUAL—A better future for our families

    Landscape Conservation and Local Infrastructure Program (LCLIP) is an unprecedented opportunity to link the future of our communities with the conservation of our farms and forests. Improving our neighborhoods will enhance the quality of life in cities while conserving farms and forests will help keep our region healthy, sustainable and prosperous.

Case in point

The City of Seattle and King County are early adopters of LCLIP, implementing the program in fall 2013. Seattle has agreed to accept 800 TDR credits into the South Lake Union and Downtown neighborhoods, which will conserve over 25,000 acres of farm, forest and rural land. Over a 25 year period, LCLIP is anticipated to provide $27.5 million in infrastructure financing, which Seattle plans to use for green streets, a community center, and bike, pedestrian and transit projects. Today, Seattle is well on its way towards the ten-year target of 400 credits in about 15% of the time.

Related Perspectives and News

Talking and Walking in Kittitas County

Two days of conversation with leaders across Kittitas County and one day of hiking. For the last few months and particularly over two concentrated days, we met with business leaders, advocates, planners, developers, farmers, elected officials and tribal leaders; to name some. The conversations only barely scratched the surface of course—of the richness of the place and the challenges it faces.

Continue

A Conservation Conversation

Green Everett Partnership volunteer and UW Bothell student, Candice Magbag, set to find out in her class on restoration ecology. In her final project, Candice covers the history of Forterra and her perspectives on conservation. Read her guest post and watch her video below.

Continue

Development = Conservation

When you walk through South Lake Union, words you might think of include Amazon, Paul Allen, tech, REI, Vulcan, Pink Elephant, growth, MOHAI, development and… conservation? How our innovative program is transforming our region’s landscape.

Continue

30 Years an Anchor of Place

Our first visit was in July 1985, short as it was. We were on our tandem and passing through, checking out places to get married. Our first stay was late April 1994, delightful as it was. By then, we had our two kids in tow, and Sina took her first steps on the cabin’s porch. We’ve been returning for a week most every year since.

Continue

Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz celebrates installation of new classrooms built from innovative Cross Laminated Timber in Seattle

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | May 30, 2017 Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz celebrates installation of new classrooms built from…

Continue

Cross Laminated Timber used as new Sequim classroom installation begins

Contact: Leda Chahim Government Affairs Director Forterra 206-905-6922 (office); 206-227-1433 (cell) | lchahim@forterra.org SEQUIM, WA — Installation began today on…

Continue

Friends of the forest: Volunteers go to work on Green Everett Day

More than 100 volunteers dug holes, placed plants and spread mulch Saturday morning at Forest Park for Green Everett Day.…

Continue

Companies’ volunteers and Forterra helping clean up Duwamish

People power is helping to clean up one of Seattle’s most polluted rivers. On Friday, about a hundred volunteers who…

Continue