Corridors

Thinking holistically in a given geography, we address the important connections between people, land and work—linking city and rural town, working lands and wild lands.

Our effort is currently focused on the enhancement and sustainability of the lands and communities along our great natural corridors—the Yakima River Canyon Scenic Byway, Great Northern Corridor/Highway 2 and the Puyallup/Carbon River Valley. We chose these regions for their diverse economic, ecological and cultural characteristics and the synergy that can be gained by coordinating projects in the specific geography of each corridor.

Seeking sustainability in Ellensburg
  • Land conservation

    Our traditional ‘bread and butter,’ we preserve critical land forever while investigating new ways to secure substantial conservation and materially improve communities while providing market return.

  • An engaged community

    Working with a range of rural community leaders and residents we re-envision vibrant rural and major town centers and explore creative, new opportunities for economic growth and development. Key to this effort is nurturing deep and ongoing relationships with Tribal nations.

  • Economic development

    Aiming to provide sustainable economic opportunities for our rural towns while improving the health of our landscapes, we seek and promote a range of initiatives, including innovative green products, historic status reinvestment and outdoor recreational opportunities.

  • Increased access to natural areas

    Forterra collaborates to further develop and improve access to recreational opportunities while enhancing the protection and restoration of the corridors’ unique natural resources

The corridors we are working in:

Yakima River Canyon Scenic Byway

Forterra’s been leading conservation and community building efforts in the Yakima River Corridor including Teanaway River Valley, Swiftwater Corridor and Yakima River Scenic Byway. With projects ranging from landscape-scale conservation acquisitions, to education and outreach, to construction of interpretive facilities, Forterra continues to lead the way, bringing a comprehensive approach to maximize the public and community value of this corridor.

Great Northern Corridor/Highway 2

This corridor has the components of a vibrant, resilient region, with employment, food and wood production, recreation and habitat restoration stretching from Everett to Stevens Pass. We’ve built long-standing partnerships with large forest landowners, taken a growing role in farmland conservation, created a new Green City relationship with Everett and launched the Skykomish Initiative bringing new energy to the revitalization of the historic town and surrounding scenic areas.

Puyallup/Carbon River Valley

This corridor connects Mt. Rainier to Commencement Bay. It follows the course of the Carbon River, from Mt. Rainier National Park through the historic communities of Wilkeson and Carbonado, and from the confluence with the Puyallup River to Puget Sound. Forterra is a leader in this corridor as a convener and partner of multiple stakeholder groups focused on cultural heritage protection, natural resource conservation, wildlife habitat protection and investments in recreational infrastructure.

Our vision of success is for Skykomish to be a recreation hub—a thriving center for outdoor activities that offers amenities like lodging, food and entertainment for visitors. Instead of stopping for a few minutes on their way to another town, families will choose to spend their weekends here.
Debbe Koch, owner of the Skykomish Toot Sweet, a candy and gift shop in downtown Skykomish.

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