Landscape Conservation and Local Infrastructure Program

Revitalizing our communities while conserving farms & forests, the Landscape Conservation and Local Infrastructure Program is a ground-breaking program that will dramatically impact how we shape our future. It combines a real estate tool called Transfer of Development Rights with a public financing opportunity for cities.

Occidental Park in Pioneer Square, Seattle
Photo by Wilford Brimley
  • ADD—Conserved farms and forests

    Transfer of Development Rights (TDR) is a market-based tool that promotes growth in places it is desired while conserving farms, forests, ecologically significant areas and open space. It gives landowners the option of selling the development value from their property as an alternative to building. Developers purchasing these rights receive bonuses, such as additional height or square footage, in areas more suitable for growth.

  • PLUS—Revitalized communities

    In exchange for accepting development rights, cities gain access to financing for revitalizing and redeveloping neighborhoods. Shared tax revenue generated by growth allows cities to invest in parks, streetscapes, utilities, roads and other infrastructure that helps make communities attractive places to live and do business.

  • TO EQUAL—A better future for our families

    Landscape Conservation and Local Infrastructure Program (LCLIP) is an unprecedented opportunity to link the future of our communities with the conservation of our farms and forests. Improving our neighborhoods will enhance the quality of life in cities while conserving farms and forests will help keep our region healthy, sustainable and prosperous.

Case in point

The City of Seattle and King County are early adopters of LCLIP, implementing the program in fall 2013. Seattle has agreed to accept 800 TDR credits into the South Lake Union and Downtown neighborhoods, which will conserve over 25,000 acres of farm, forest and rural land. Over a 25 year period, LCLIP is anticipated to provide $27.5 million in infrastructure financing, which Seattle plans to use for green streets, a community center, and bike, pedestrian and transit projects. Today, Seattle is well on its way towards the ten-year target of 400 credits in about 15% of the time.

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