Cedar River Stewardship in Action

Since 2010, the Stewardship in Action (SiA) program has systematically tackled invasive knotweed along the length of the Cedar River and worked to create healthy forests in its place.

Live along the Cedar River?

Because knotweed spreads so easily, participation from all landowners is essential for effective control. The link below directs to a form which provides Forterra permission to survey, treat, and monitor knotweed on your property for a chosen duration of time at no cost to you.

2020 Landowner Project Agreement

By participating in this program, you’re contributing to a landscape scale effort to improve water quality and restore salmon habitat in your watershed. You’re also preventing damage to your property and septic systems, and our community’s roads. Healthy watersheds require every landowner to be a steward of their environment, so we thank you for your participation!

Forterra is working to eradicate knotweed on the Cedar River

What is knotweed and why control it?

Knotweed (polygonum spp.) is a bamboo-like, non-native plant that wreaks havoc on properties and ecosystems. Once established, knotweed forms dense stands that crowd out native vegetation and clog small waterways, increasing bank erosion and lowering the quality of riparian habitat for fish and wildlife.

Knotweed spreads rapidly and is remarkably difficult to remove. Winter floods and beaver activity can bring knotweed to your property, so even if you haven’t seen it before, you may have a new infestation on your property.

We pride ourselves on being good stewards of the land, and we feel this non-native plant removal has not only benefitted our land but all of the wildlife in the area.
Mike Tonda, Stewardship in Action participant

Restoring riverside forests

After five years of consistent effort, the riverbanks are beginning to show signs of recovery; the knotweed is less prevalent, yet the newly cleared riverbanks are susceptible to the invasion of other harmful weeds. We aim to prevent that from happening, using nature as our strongest ally. SiA offers private landowners free design services and installation of native gardens along the Cedar River and its connecting streams. In addition to providing erosion control, these streamside forests store and filter stormwater before it enters the creek, cast shade over the creek to keep temperatures cool for salmon, and provide food and shelter for wildlife.Native plants are the key to a healthy river, and when they are installed by our expert team, they are a beautiful addition to a riverfront space.

Forterra staff and crew install native plants on private property along the Cedar.

We install riverside trees and shrubs using grant funding, at no cost to the landowner. If you haven’t already accessed this resource, we can work with you to design and install a planting project that meets your goals – whether you’d like beautiful flowers in spring, tasty berries in summer, or gorgeous colors in fall. Contact us to get started!

In addition to controlling knotweed, Forterra collaborates with private landowners to plant native trees and shrubs along the Cedar River and its connecting streams. Planting projects are designed and installed using grant funding, at no cost to the landowner.  These trees and shrubs help stabilize banks, store and filter stormwater before it enters the river, cast shade over the river to keep temperatures cool for salmon, and provide food and shelter for wildlife. If you haven’t already accessed this resource, we can work with you to design and install a planting project that meets your goals – whether you’d like beautiful flowers in spring, tasty berries in summer, or gorgeous colors in fall.

Contact us to get started!

The program is a collaborative partnership between Forterra, Seattle Public Utilities and the King County Noxious Weed Control Program. To schedule a consultation or for more information contact Eli Tome (814) 853-2933 or Alex Selvey (206-905-6952).

Comments