Land Stewardship

Help care for the lands upon which our sustainable future depends.

From neighborhood parks stewarded by volunteers, to managing our iconic conserved landscapes, to restoring river and floodplain habitat along the Cedar and Duwamish Rivers, your support takes care of the lands we all love.

Pulling invasive species to restore the health of the land
Photo by Bill Bankson
  • Green City Partnerships

    In cities throughout the region, we engage community volunteers to restore public lands in urban areas to help restore and maintain our urban parks while building community and an ethics of stewardship throughout cities in our region.

    Green Cities

  • Forterra lands stewardship and restoration

    We care for and tend to the lands and conservation easements Forterra is responsible for in 12 counties to enhance their ecological and community value.

    Forterra lands

  • Riparian corridors

    We restore the riparian and floodplain habitat along our critical waterways: the Cedar River, Green-Duwamish River, Bear Creek Watershed, and Skykomish River.

    Riparian efforts

When I see a child having a real encounter with a tree that she’s planting, or when I hear someone at a work party saying, ‘This is the first time I’ve ever picked up a shovel,’ that’s why I get out of bed in the morning.
Dylan Mendenhall, Schmitz Park Forest Steward

Related Perspectives and News

Invasive Species Awareness Week

On a basic level, most invasive species are non-native organisms (plant, animal, insect, etc.) that have been ‘introduced’ into an environment. This year, in honor of Invasive Species Awareness Week, we asked the experts what their “favorite” invasive is and the gory details behind their love-hate relationship with these plants.

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Lakes of blue (camas)

Blue camas is a signature plant of what has become an increasingly rare habitat in the South Sound—our native prairies.

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Hugelkultur

Hugelkultur, have you heard of it? It’s like active composting while growing plants. This approach is believed to have originated in Europe as a technique for growing plants in places with harsh climates and short growing seasons. Directly translating to “hill culture,” it’s not fully known whether the name came from the hill-like garden it creates, or because it originated in the hill-towns of Europe.

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Washington’s Early-Bloomers

The official start of spring is less than a month away, which means it’s that time of year when we will start to see some petals and color popping back into our local landscapes. Find out which native flowers you can expect to see in the coming weeks throughout Washington.

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Historic agreement gives community chance to preserve Wayne Golf Course back nine

Forterra is interested in financing the purchase of the 89-acre Wayne Golf Course to provide the Bothell community an opportunity to creatively structure a permanent preservation strategy to support a variety of publicly-accessible uses and habitat restoration actions which will put the Wayne land at the very heart of the community.

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Triple Creek Ranch easement Kittitas’ largest

Forterra and Kittitas County permanently conserved Triple Creek Ranch with the purchase of a 260-acre working-farmland conservation easement, the largest…

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Everett develops park restoration plan

The City is working with Forterra’s Green Cities Program on a new plan, The Green Everett Partnership, which will provide…

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Cedar River Restoration Program winning battle against knotweed

After five years of restoration work on the Cedar River and its tributaries, the collaborative Stewardship in Action (SiA) program…

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