Land Stewardship

Help care for the lands upon which our sustainable future depends.

From neighborhood parks stewarded by volunteers, to managing our iconic conserved landscapes, to restoring river and floodplain habitat along the Cedar and Duwamish Rivers, your support takes care of the lands we all love.

Pulling invasive species to restore the health of the land
Photo by Bill Bankson
  • Green City Partnerships

    In cities throughout the region, we engage community volunteers to restore public lands in urban areas to help restore and maintain our urban parks while building community and an ethics of stewardship throughout cities in our region.

    Green Cities

  • Forterra lands stewardship and restoration

    We care for and tend to the lands and conservation easements Forterra is responsible for in 12 counties to enhance their ecological and community value.

    Forterra lands

  • Riparian corridors

    We restore the riparian and floodplain habitat along our critical waterways: the Cedar River, Green-Duwamish River, Bear Creek Watershed, and Skykomish River.

    Riparian efforts

When I see a child having a real encounter with a tree that she’s planting, or when I hear someone at a work party saying, ‘This is the first time I’ve ever picked up a shovel,’ that’s why I get out of bed in the morning.
Dylan Mendenhall, Schmitz Park Forest Steward

Related Perspectives and News

Volunteer all-stars restore our urban oases

For many people, a nearby park is an oasis of calm and a place to recharge. Yet our urban forests and open spaces are often under threat of neglect. Volunteer Forest Stewards spend their weekends working hard at a labor of love, are instrumental in keeping our urban forests healthy and vibrant.

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Ridge top in Middle Fork Snoqualmie Valley unmasked

Just west of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness is a swath of land with stunning 360° views. These 20 acres atop Zorro Ridge provide uninterrupted habitat and public recreational access in the central Cascades.

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Hugelkultur

Hugelkultur, have you heard of it? It’s like active composting while growing plants. This approach is believed to have originated in Europe as a technique for growing plants in places with harsh climates and short growing seasons. Directly translating to “hill culture,” it’s not fully known whether the name came from the hill-like garden it creates, or because it originated in the hill-towns of Europe.

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Saving Lake Serene

Forterra officially closed on the last-remaining privately owned section of the popular Lake Serene Trail in October 2018. Thanks to massive community support, the purchase of this 190-acre property preserved the trees along the trail and guaranteed permanent public access to Lake Serene Trail’s breathtaking views, waterfalls, and reflective alpine lake—forever.

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Working with Pearl Jam to combat climate change

It’s a bold idea – and what better place to start than in one of the greenest cities in the…

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Mukilteo Saves Historic Japanese Gulch for Community

The City of Mukilteo has purchased 98 acres within Japanese Gulch for $5.4 million dollars from the court-ordered Metropolitan Mortgage…

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Keeping Dead Man’s Pond habitat alive

Thanks to support from The Russell Family Foundation, Forterra was recently able to acquire five urban wetland acres in southwest…

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Forterra completes sale of Dead Man’s Pond in Puyallup

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE TACOMA – Forterra has completed the sale of 5 acres of urban wildlife habitat known as Dead…

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